foursquare benefits consumer and business

Last month the CatchFire team and I blogged about an event we attended back in April, “The Seacoast Social Media Round Table,” during which I presented Foursquare for Business. Not only is Foursquare a remarkable tool for consumers, but also businesses – the app offers free analytics (with just a simple fee of $1 for claiming a venue), business promoting, customer engagement, etc.

In recent news, Foursquare has refined its search capabilities with “super-specific searches” – which informs the user of a certain location, indicating whether the person has been to the location’s venues before, and what to expect for the price ranges of each venue.

Users can filter their searches based on the inputted information. This application is very convenient for someone looking to venture in unfamiliar territory and at a reasonable cost; if a person wanted to search for a restaurant that was relatively inexpensive, Foursquare capabilities now meet that request. For those who wish to keep it simple, this location-based social network allows users to select “best nearby” to see the app’s recommendations, search “specials” for good deals and so forth.

Foursquare really hits home on its consumer behavior marketing component, in that it focuses on the consumer and what satisfies the needs and the impacts through such searches for the consumer and society. [From a business standpoint] Foursquare approaches many elements on behalf of businesses in attempts to understand the decision-making processes of the consumer.

According to an article posted by Mashable, Foursquare has just launched a promotion program for businesses (a test) which allows businesses to lure in nearby consumers by promoting a photo of a dish or a glowing review left by a Foursquare user.

With the latest changes, Foursquare is catering to both consumer and business; with the “super-specific searches” consumers can find exactly what they want whatever it may be. The Promotion Program allows businesses to “highlight” their products, goods and/or services so that a consumer nearby can easily find what they’re super-specific searching for – thus both changes work in tandem with one another.